show don't tell

Show Don’t Tell

Writing is always more interesting and dynamic when you use the ‘show don’t tell’ technique. When you use this technique, you let your readers experience the story through action and words, feelings and senses instead of through your description. Below you find ways to show different emotions instead of telling your reader how your characters feel. Afraid heart beating nonstop hands trembling knees shaking lips quivering screaming fast, heavy breathing covering eyes with your hands clenching onto things Angry steam coming out of your ears eyes squinting red in the face huffing and puffing hands on hips while stomping feet veins popping out yelling at the top of your lungs clenching fists and gritting teeth Cold shivering and teeth chattering

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archetypes

Character Archetypes

When creating your characters for your story, you might want to use one or more of Jung’s archetypes. In order to do so, the information below might help you to give your character a personality. THE INNOCENT Motto: Free to be you and me Goal: Happiness Fear: Punishment Core desire: To get to paradise Strategy: To do things right Talent: Faith and optimism Characteristics: Openness to experience, trust, honesty Challenges: Naiveté, denial that problems exist Innocents are the exemplars of optimism, and will always be kind and trusting. They help to make the world a brighter, nicer place, but sometimes they need a reality-check because they see everything through rose-tinted glasses and that clouds their vision of the truth. THE

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said

Replace ‘Said’

In writing dialogue, many writers tend to use the word ‘said’ far too much. There are many different words you can use to replace ‘said’ and to bring some feeling into your writing, for instance: “What a mess!” she said. or “What a mess!” she groaned. The word ‘groaned’ tells you a bit more about the feelings of your character. Below is a list of words you can use to replace ‘said’. Please always consult a dictionary if you don’t know the full meaning of a word! accused cracked interrogated reiterated acknowledged cried interrupted rejoiced acquiesced criticized intimated rejoined added croaked intimidated related addressed cross-examined itemized remarked admitted crowed jeered remembered admonished debated jested reminded advised decided joked repeated advocated

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sound

Sounds

There are times in writing where you don’t want to describe what sound a character hears, but you want to use a word for the sound, because it will make your story stronger. Below are words you can use to describe sounds of various types. bang cluck hum ring swoosh bark clunk jingle rippling tap beep crack jangle roar tearing bellow crackle kachunk rumble throb blare crash knock rushing thud blast creak mew rustle thump blat dingdong moan scream thunder bleat drip moo screech tick bong drumming murmur schrunch tick-tock boom fizz neigh shriek tinkle bray glug patter sizzle toot buzz gnashing peal slam trill cackle gobble peep snap twang cheep grating ping snarl twitter chime grinding pop snort wail

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misused words

Misused Words

There are some words that are frequently used wrongly. Make sure you say what you want to say! accept – except accept means ‘to receive’, for example: I accept your apology. except means ‘not including’, for example: Everyone is going, except Edward. advice – advise advice is a noun and means ‘recommendation on what to do’, for example: We await your advice on how to proceed. advise is a verb and means ‘to recommend something’, for example: Could you please advise how we should proceed? all ready – already all ready means ‘prepared’, for example: We are all ready to leave for the airport. already means ‘by this time’, for example: We have already done the packing. all together –

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narrator

Narrator Types

The narrator is the person who tells the story, who lets the reader “hear” and “see” what happens in a story. The mode of narration is also called the ‘point of view’. There are different kind of narrators. Below you will find a short description of some of them. First person The first person narrator tells the story from his own perspective, using words like ‘I’ and ‘me’ and ‘my’. The story is about things this character – the narrator – is experiencing. The narrator is part of the story. Thoughts are being told, not shown. The inner thoughts of this character is revealed to the audience, but not to the other characters. The first person narrator can be a

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character traits

Character Traits

Every person on the face of this earth has positive and negative character traits and so should the characters in your story. Below you find positive and negative character traits to use in your writing. As always, make sure you consult a dictionary when you don’t know whether a word means what you think it does! Tip: Use positive character traits to find negative ones and vice versa. Positive accessible educated lovable responsible adaptable efficient loving responsive adventurous eloquent loyal romantic affable empathetic magnanimous scrupulous affectionate encouraging mature secure agreeable energetic meticulous self-confident ambitious enthusiastic moderate delf-disciplined amicable exuberant modest selfless amusing fair neat sensible articulate faithful non-authoritarian sensitive balanced fearless obedient shy benevolent firm objective sincere brave flexible open

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very

Replace ‘Very’

Writers know more than enough words to tell a story, but sometimes, you want to make something sound just a bit stronger. Below is a list of words where you can avoid saying ‘very’, but use a different words instead. As always, consult your dictionary if you are not sure about the proper meaning of the word and whether it will fit your text. Avoid ‘very…’ Rather say accurate precise, exact, unimpeachable, perfect, flawless afraid terrified, fearful, alarmed aggresive forceful, overconfident, insistent, hardline amazed astounded, flabbergasted, astonished, shocked angry furious, irate, enraged, incensed, fuming, livid annoying exasperating, frustrating, irritating, anxious furious, irate, enraged, incensed, fuming, livid aware conscious, savvy, apprised, mindful, cognizant bad awful, deplorable, appalling, rotten, miserable, atrocious basic

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punctuation

Punctuation

Punctuation is essential to any piece of writing. It allows for pacing and order in your story. Try to read a piece of text without any punctuation: the instant hailey shut the door behind her and saw the cab driver he reminded her of her need to get home her nipples pressed hard against the smooth creme colored fabric of her Marilyn Monroe dress piercing blue eyes looked deep into her soul where to miss his words were more than just a question it was a caress as he spoke his eyes touched her body from top to toe why it made her feel safe instead of irritated hailey didnt know and didnt care to explain to herself she gave

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emotions

Emotions

In writing, emotions sometimes play a big role. You can say that your character is sad or happy, but there are so many other words you can use to even better convey the emotions your character is experiencing. Below are lists of words for the emotions ‘happy’, ‘sad’, ‘angry’, ‘scared’ and ‘confused’. Emotion: Happy STRONG MILD WEAK ecstatic admired content elated alive flattered energized amused fortunate enthusiastic appreciated glad excited assured good exuberant cheerful hopeful jubilant confident peaceful loved delighted pleased marvelous determined relaxed terrific encouraged satisfied thrilled fulfilled uplifted grateful gratified\joyful justified optimistic proud relieved resolved respected valued Emotion: Sad STRONG MILD WEAK burdened abandoned apathetic condemned alienated bad crushed ashamed deflated defeated degraded disenchanted dejected deprived lost demoralized

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