Elements of a Story

Elements of a Story

Every story you have ever read had a couple of basic elements and each (longer) story you write should have the same elements to keep the story running and allow the action to develop in a way your reader can follow. The five basic elements: Characters Setting Plot Conflict Theme Characters The characters are the people the story is about, and they should be introduced in such a way that the reader can form an image of each person. By giving an detailed description of a character’s physical attributes and personality traits, the reader can visualize the person. However, make sure you show the reader these attributes/traits and not tell the reader what they are. The two main characters are

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transitional words

Transitions

The way for writers to make their readers recognize connections between the ideas in their stories, is to use transitions. Transition words help you to present the information in your story in an effective manner, like signaling connection between a main idea and supporting ideas. Besides this, transition word also works to show contrasts and comparisons, or to identify concepts that are related. Transitions words can be used within and between paragraphs, but always be careful not to use too many transitional words, as it can make your story harder to read. Some sentences in a story can stand alone without any transitions, but other sentences might need transitions to make it clear to your reader how the sentences relate

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name generator

Name Your Characters

So many times I have a story in my mind, want to write it and then I sit staring at a blank page, not knowing what to name my character. I come up with several names, but then reject them either because I have used the name in a different story before, or the name just doesn’t fit the story I want to write. What I did in the past was to type use the search term ”female names’ or ‘male names’ to find something that fit. I always ended up on sites with baby names, and in the end I mostly found something, but by then I was half an hour or an hour further, and still needed to

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jobs for characters

Jobs for Characters

We give the characters in our stories thoughts and words and a personality, but why not give them a job too? Of course the job your character does can say something about them too, but it can also open your plot up for some interesting twists and turns, and interactions with others on the work floor. Below you will find a list with jobs for different genres, different time settings… from silversmith to pilot, from witch to pastor. So, how does your character earn a living? Academic Fletcher Prime minister Accountant Flight attendant Printer Adventurer Florist Prison guard Airplane mechanic Footman Prisoner Animal trainer Foster parent Professor of economics Apartment maintenance Game creator Professor of history Archer Gardener Professor of

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hobbies

Character Hobbies/Activities

When you write a story, no matter when it’s short or long, your characters will be doing something, whether it’s walking or sitting or talking. To give your character some depth, you might want to consider giving them hobbies, or some activities they frequently do. Below you find a list of suggestions for hobbies and activities. These might spark some ideas of your own. acting driving organizing archaeology eating paintball archery electronics party planning architecture embroidery photography art exploring playing cards arts and crafts family time playing chess astronomy fantasy football playing darts backpacking fashion playing sports baking fireworks poker band fishing pottery baseball flower arranging racing basketball flying kites reading bird watching football scrap booking bowling foreign languages scuba

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word cloud habits

Character Habits

When you write a story and you are building your characters, one way to do that is to add habits – things your character frequently does, and which is part of their nature. Those habits can be positive, but also negative things. Below you will find a list with 100 habits characters might have, and I am sure this list will spark more, and help you in your writing. Always busy on their phone Obsessively checking phone Analyzing others Over eating Apologizing Over-medicating Asking a lot of questions Overspending while shopping Avoiding gazes Overworking Being lazy Pacing Being wasteful Peeling scabs Biting Picking their nose Biting a pen Procrastinating Biting nails Rambling Chewing their lip Reading the daily newspaper Chewing

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speech bubbles

Other ways to say…

In writing, we are always looking for original way to say things, but sometimes we tend to use the same phrases over and over again. Below you will find a couple of suggestions to replace some of those worn-out phrases in your writing. But, be careful… don’t just find a new favorite to use, but alternate between what you use in your texts. … on the other hand all the same nonetheless alternatively on the contrary at any rate on the flip side having said that otherwise however that being said in any case that said in contrast then again nevertheless whereas … I don’t like it I dislike it I’m not crazy about it I don’t appreciate that I’m

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facial expression

Facial Expressions

A big part of your writing is building your character. Part of that is not only where your character lives or what kind of work he does, but also his facial expressions in certain circumstances. Does he furrow his brow even when he’s not upset or does she always have that sparkle in her eyes? Below are examples of descriptions for facial expressions you can use in your writing. Eyes his eyes widened she glanced up to the ceiling his eyes went round she winked her eyelids drooped tears filled her eyes her eyes narrowed his eyes welled up his eyes lit up her eyes flooded with tears his eyes darted her eyes were wet he squinted his eyes glistened

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replace

Replace ‘Looks/Seems Like’

We are always looking for ways to make our writing stronger, and more dynamic. One thing you can do is to replace ‘looks like’ or ‘seems like’ with other words to change the sentence structure to something more active. Below you will find words you can use. Please consult your dictionary if you are not sure about the proper meaning of the word and whether it will fit your text. adpots hints proposes affects imitates refers announces implies reflects assumes insinuates reiterates betrays mentions represents broadcasts mimes resembles commends mimics resonates communicates mirrors reveals declares mocks reverberates denotes notifies signifies designates offers spoofs divulges parallels steers echoes parodies stimulates emulates parrots suggests exposes poses tells fakes pretends touts feigns proclaims

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write quicker

Eight tips to write quicker without quality loss

Have you ever noticed that there are writers out there who can post a new story or blog post in a flash, and there you are, sitting at your computer and battling to get the words to flow? To learn how to write quicker is like training for sport. It takes practice. It’s all in the preparation. To be able to write quicker you have to be disciplined and you need to have a proper preparation to write quicker without quality loss. So how do you do it? Here are …….. tips on how to write quicker without lowering the quality of your words. Think about your subject before you write Think about the subject you want to write about.

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