feedback

The Why and Rules of Feedback

With each round of the Smut Marathon we invite writers and readers to give feedback on the submittied stories, in which they can also assess whether or not a participant has adhered to the assignment. It is good to see that people – readers and writers – are making an effort to leave feedback, sometimes on all the stories, sometimes only on a couple of them. In this message, like in a previous post, we want to shine a light on giving and receiving feedback. Why feedback? What is so important about giving feedback? Why do the writes want that? Why would they ‘expose’ themselves to ‘critisism’? Through feedback the writers get the opportunity to look critically at their own

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moment

How to Capture a Moment in Writing

Every day many things happen in our lives – you get up, you go to work, you visit friends, go to a birthday party or you board a plane to co on vacation. A walk in the woods can turn into an unexpected meeting or during your vacation you discover or do things that are totally new to you. For the first time you walk hand in hand in a new city with someone new and you ask yourself: what does it mean? You say your goodbyes to someone, not knowing when you will see them again. Many moments fill a human life and those are the moments we want to capture in our stories, because it influences your writing

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feedback

Eight Reasons to Cherish Feedback

Seven reasons to cherish feedback was originally written in Dutch by Liza Daen and was adjusted for this site by Marie Rebelle. A very good method to develop and improve yourself as writer of erotic stories is to give and receive feedback. Getting feedback from readers and fellow writers makes you vulnerable. It’s scary. Somewhere you hear that little voice in your mind: “What if they don’t like it?” or “What if I had a wrong understanding of the assignment?” Please be assured that constructive criticism that is shared with respect will make you better as an author. Below you will find seven reasons why you should cherish feedback. Reason 1: What happens in your mind, is not automatically the

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metaphor

Metaphors in Erotic Texts

The use of metaphors can make your erotic texts more striking, but there are a couple of pitfalls you should look out for. What is a metaphor? A metaphor is a form of imagery, which is expressed as an implicit (unspoken) comparison, in which an expression (sentence or phrase) has a non-literal meaning that is applicable by (more or less) recognizable attributes. Simpler said: A metaphor states that one thing is another thing. It equates those two thing not because they are the same, but for the sake of comparison or symbolism. Taking a metaphor literally, will probably sound very strange. Take this famous quote from Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare: It is the East, and Juliet is the sun!

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red pen

Editing Your Short Stories

Writing a story of 3.000 words or less is different from writing a full-length book or even a story of 10.000 words. The shorter the story, the more important it is to get your reader ‘in the story’ as soon as possible, but also to give your story a good plot and ending. If you are used to writing longer pieces, it can feel strange to write shorter stories. The trick to keeping your stories tight and engaging lies in the editing. If you edit your story well, it will become more powerful. Editing tips Sit down, write your story and then let it rest for a day or two before you sit down to edit it. The following tips

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edit

Self Editing

It is one thing to write a story, but something else to edit it. There’s always the option to send the first version of your text – whether short or longer – off to an editor, but there are a lot of things you can do to self edit your texts. The Editing Checklist Mechanics Capitalize the first word of each sentence. Capitalize all proper nouns (place, people, titles). End each sentence with a period, a question mark or an exclamation point. Use punctuation correctly. Check your spelling. Indent the beginning of each new paragraph (this is optional). Grammar Check for sentence fragments and remove them, unless they have a real purpose. There are no run-on sentences that should be

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dialogue

How to use dialogue in your stories

Nowadays all fiction stories are filled with dialogue where the characters speak to each other and help to tell the story. Sometimes beginning authors are hesitant to use dialogue. This is rightly so, as it’s not easy to write dialogue. Dialogue between two characters should be written as if they live in the ‘real world’, but in this already lies a pitfall: the ‘real world’ has no plot. Everyday conversations frequently have no purpose at all and those don’t belong in a story. Necessary dialogue One way for an author to learn which dialogue is necessary for a story is to read a variety of novels that have been published over the last ten years and to study the dialogue.

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the end

Story Endings

We have already looked at different story openings, but how you end your story is just as important. There are several different ways to do it: Advice: If you write an informative piece, you can end your piece with some advice for your reader. Capturing Emotion/Warm Fuzzy: Tears sting your eyes when you finish the story, or you the writer has at least managed to make you feel emotional in some way. Circular: End your story with the same idea, or even the same words, that you have used to start your story. Cliffhanger: This kind of endings teases the reader to read onto the next chapter or the next book in a series. It leaves the reader hanging or

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voice

Describe A Voice

What does your character’s voice sound like? Does he always talk loud or does his voice barely carry across a room? Instead of describing your character’s voice, you can use different words to ‘explain’ the sound. Below are some words that will help you to describe someone’s voice. adenoidal if someone’s voice is adenoidal, some of the sounds seems to come through the nose appealing your voice shows that you want help, approval or agreement breathy with loud breathing noises brittle if you speak in a brittle voice, you sound as if you’re about to cry croaky a low rough voice that sounds if someone has a sore throat dead a voice that shows no emotion disembodied a voice that

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character flaws

Character Flaws

Whether your story is long or short, you want to give your main character(s) some personality traits, but not all of them can be positive or perfect. Your characters should have flaws to make them come across to the general public as real people. Below you find a list of character flaws to use in your writing. absent-minded emo nervous shallow abusive envious noisy shy acts superior erratic non-violent smart-ass addict evil nosey sneaky aimless fickle obnoxious solemn alcoholic fierce obsessive sore loser anarchist finicky offended easily spaz angsty flirt oppressor spineless anxious forgetful outsider spiteful arrogant gluttonous overambitious spoiled assertive greedy overconfident squeamish attitude gruff overdramatic stereotypical audacious gullible overemotional stubborn avoids problems hedonistic overprotective superstitious big mouth holds

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