transitional words

Transitions

The way for writers to make their readers recognize connections between the ideas in their stories, is to use transitions. Transition words help you to present the information in your story in an effective manner, like signaling connection between a main idea and supporting ideas. Besides this, transition word also works to show contrasts and comparisons, or to identify concepts that are related. Transitions words can be used within and between paragraphs, but always be careful not to use too many transitional words, as it can make your story harder to read. Some sentences in a story can stand alone without any transitions, but other sentences might need transitions to make it clear to your reader how the sentences relate

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jobs for characters

Jobs for Characters

We give the characters in our stories thoughts and words and a personality, but why not give them a job too? Of course the job your character does can say something about them too, but it can also open your plot up for some interesting twists and turns, and interactions with others on the work floor. Below you will find a list with jobs for different genres, different time settings… from silversmith to pilot, from witch to pastor. So, how does your character earn a living? Academic Fletcher Prime minister Accountant Flight attendant Printer Adventurer Florist Prison guard Airplane mechanic Footman Prisoner Animal trainer Foster parent Professor of economics Apartment maintenance Game creator Professor of history Archer Gardener Professor of

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word cloud habits

Character Habits

When you write a story and you are building your characters, one way to do that is to add habits – things your character frequently does, and which is part of their nature. Those habits can be positive, but also negative things. Below you will find a list with 100 habits characters might have, and I am sure this list will spark more, and help you in your writing. Always busy on their phone Obsessively checking phone Analyzing others Over eating Apologizing Over-medicating Asking a lot of questions Overspending while shopping Avoiding gazes Overworking Being lazy Pacing Being wasteful Peeling scabs Biting Picking their nose Biting a pen Procrastinating Biting nails Rambling Chewing their lip Reading the daily newspaper Chewing

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speech bubbles

Other ways to say…

In writing, we are always looking for original way to say things, but sometimes we tend to use the same phrases over and over again. Below you will find a couple of suggestions to replace some of those worn-out phrases in your writing. But, be careful… don’t just find a new favorite to use, but alternate between what you use in your texts. … on the other hand all the same nonetheless alternatively on the contrary at any rate on the flip side having said that otherwise however that being said in any case that said in contrast then again nevertheless whereas … I don’t like it I dislike it I’m not crazy about it I don’t appreciate that I’m

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facial expression

Facial Expressions

A big part of your writing is building your character. Part of that is not only where your character lives or what kind of work he does, but also his facial expressions in certain circumstances. Does he furrow his brow even when he’s not upset or does she always have that sparkle in her eyes? Below are examples of descriptions for facial expressions you can use in your writing. Eyes his eyes widened she glanced up to the ceiling his eyes went round she winked her eyelids drooped tears filled her eyes her eyes narrowed his eyes welled up his eyes lit up her eyes flooded with tears his eyes darted her eyes were wet he squinted his eyes glistened

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feedback

The Why and Rules of Feedback

With each round of the Smut Marathon we invite writers and readers to give feedback on the submittied stories, in which they can also assess whether or not a participant has adhered to the assignment. It is good to see that people – readers and writers – are making an effort to leave feedback, sometimes on all the stories, sometimes only on a couple of them. In this message, like in a previous post, we want to shine a light on giving and receiving feedback. Why feedback? What is so important about giving feedback? Why do the writes want that? Why would they ‘expose’ themselves to ‘critisism’? Through feedback the writers get the opportunity to look critically at their own

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feedback

Eight Reasons to Cherish Feedback

Seven reasons to cherish feedback was originally written in Dutch by Liza Daen and was adjusted for this site by Marie Rebelle. A very good method to develop and improve yourself as writer of erotic stories is to give and receive feedback. Getting feedback from readers and fellow writers makes you vulnerable. It’s scary. Somewhere you hear that little voice in your mind: “What if they don’t like it?” or “What if I had a wrong understanding of the assignment?” Please be assured that constructive criticism that is shared with respect will make you better as an author. Below you will find seven reasons why you should cherish feedback. Reason 1: What happens in your mind, is not automatically the

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